N. Wendell Todd, MD

N. Wendell Todd, MD  

Professor
Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery



EDUCATION

MD: Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, 1969
Internship: Mixed Medicine, Charity Hospital of Louisiana at New Orleans, Tulane Division, 1970
Residency: Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, GA, 1974
MPH: Emory University, Rollins School of Public Health, 2004

LICENCES/CERTIFICATIONS

State of Georgia Medical License
American Board of Otolaryngology

CURRENT AND FORMER APPOINTMENTS

Adjunct Assistant Professor
University of Arizona School of Medicine, Tucson

Professor
Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Emory University School of Medicine

Professor
Pediatrics
Emory University School of Medicine

United States Public Health Service, Indian Health Service, Phoenix

HONORS AND AWARDS

Alpha Omega Alpha
Best Doctors in America
American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery’s Honor Award
Gerald S. Gussack Award, Georgia Society of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery
Otology Award, Southern Section, Triological Society, Naples, Florida
Champion for Early Hearing Detection and Intervention, Georgia Chapter, American Academy of Pediatrics

PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS

Triological Society
American College of Surgeons
American Otological Society
American Society for Pediatric Otolaryngology
American Academy of Pediatrics

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

Todd NW: Malleus stapes offset. Laryngoscope. 118:110-115, 2008.

Todd NW: Jacobson's nerve clues to the round window niche. Cochlear Implants International. 10(2):63-69, 2009.

Todd NW: Transtympanic electrode positioning: Manubrium is a poor guide. Otology & Neurotology 30(2):231-236, 2009.

Todd NW, Graw M, Dietzel M: "Lateral angle" of the internal auditory canal: Non-association with temporal bone pneumatization. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 55(1):141-144, 2010.

Arviso LC, Todd NW: The foreshortened malleus: Anatomic variant, not pathologic sign. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. In press May 4, 2010.

RESEARCH FOCUS

Pediatric otolaryngology, in its multiple facets, though mostly ear-related.  I have followed questions prompted by patient problems, and helped trainees (resident, physicians, and students) address problems that piqued their interest.  Even a cursory read of publications and presentations will reveal the depth and breadth of these questions.  In recent years, in addition to addressing correlates of families' following-through from universal newborn screening (my MPH "thesis"), my research has focused on temporal bone anatomy and cochlear implantation.