Neuropsychologists

 


Amy Alderson, PhD

Dr. Alderson joined the Neuropsychology faculty in the Rehabilitation Medicine department in 2007 as an Assistant Professor. After completing her undergraduate studies in Psychology at Texas A&M University, Dr. Alderson received her master's and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. Dr. Alderson then completed an NIH Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Alabama in Birmingham. She has authored or co-authored 15 journal articles and has given over 31 invited presentations at conferences. Dr. Alderson is a Board Certified Neuropsychologist and a Diplomate of the American Board of Professional Psychology/ American Board of Clinical Psychology.

Dr. Hampstead
Benjamin Hampstead, PhD

Dr. Hampstead joined the Neuropsychology faculty in Rehabilitation Medicine as an Assistant Professor in June 2008. After receiving his undergraduate degree in Psychology from Macalester College, Dr. Hampstead received his master's and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Drexel University. Upon the completion of his doctoral degree, Dr. Hampstead began a Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Neuropsychology at Emory University. Dr. Hampstead's research is focused on neural substrates of memory, as well as behavioral and fMRI changes following cognitive rehabilitation for memory deficits in aging, dementia, and traumatic brain injury. Currently, Dr. Hampstead is a member of the American Psychological Association, International Neuropsychological Society, National Academy of Neuropsychology, and the Georgia Psychological Association.

Dr. Moore
Anna Moore, PhD

As a clinical neuropsychologist, I am interested in brain-behavior relationships in a very broad sense. My research efforts focus on understanding the neural substrates of memory, attention, and language. I study changes in these brain functions that occur over the course of healthy aging and as the result of brain insults such as stroke and dementia. Understanding the brain systems responsible for both healthy and impaired functions increases our ability to develop and implement strategies to rehabilitate or compensate for these changes. Standardized neuropsychological tests as well as neuroimaging techniques are important tools that I regularly employ in my research. In my clinical practice, I work with people living with epilepsy, stroke, dementia, traumatic brain injuries, tumors, and other disorders affecting the central nervous system. I conduct neuropsychological evaluations of cognitive and psychosocial strengths and weaknesses, and help patients, families, and other healthcare providers understand, manage, and respond to changes in brain function.

Dr. Stringer
Anthony Stringer, MD

Dr. Stringer is a Professor in the Rehabilitation Medicine department and serves as the Director of the Division of Neuropsychology and Behavioral Health at Emory. After completing his undergraduate education in Psychology at Wayne State University, Dr. Stringer went on to receive his master's and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Wayne State University. He then completed his Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Neuropsychology at the University of Florida. Dr. Stringer is Certified in the Practice of Cognitive Rehabilitation Therapy (CPCRT) by the Society for Cognitive Rehabilitation and a Diplomate of the American Board of Professional Psychology/ American Board of Clinical Neuropsychology. His research is focused on cognitive rehabilitation outcomes following traumatic brain injury, stroke, epilepsy, and other neurological conditions. Dr. Stringer is a member of American Psychological Association, International Neuropsychological Society, National Academy of Neuropsychology, the Georgia Psychological Association, and the Society for Cognitive Rehabilitation.