Taking Pride in the Care We Provide: Celebrating Atlanta Pride

Date: Oct 13, 2023

At Emory Healthcare, we pledge to meet the special health care needs of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning, intersex and asexual (LGBTQIA) community with respect and compassion. We commit to making sure that all LGBTQIA patients can access quality care in a welcoming and supportive environment.

As we celebrate Atlanta Pride, we asked some of our team members to tell us why Pride is meaningful for them, and about their proudest moments working in health care. 

Andres Castro

Medical Assistant
Emory Heart & Vascular Center

Andres Castro headshotAbout Pride:Pride, to me, it means accepting and letting others know that it’s okay, you’re not alone.

Working in health care:Making my patients smile is an award to me, and it’s daily. So smile, ‘cause it’s contagious!

Jessie Preston

Patient Service Coordinator
The Emory Clinic

Jessie Preston selfieAbout Pride:It’s an annual opportunity that acknowledges, honors and appreciates people from different walks of life who all want to live, thrive and be respected and continuously advocate for equality, inclusion and acceptance. I’m proud to work for a company and organization that pushes for human rights and justice for their employees, and it speaks volumes that my voice is heard and my presence is seen.

Working in health care:Every moment is a proud moment as I intend to always do the work that makes me proud by providing care, comfort and understanding to and for each patient that I encounter.

Megan Chesser

Pharmacy Tech
Emory Specialty Pharmacy

Megan Chesser headshotAbout Pride:Atlanta Pride is meaningful to me because it allows the LGBT+ and allied communities to come together and show support and love for each other. It serves as a reminder that we are a strong community and together we can work towards a progressive future.

Working in health care:Some of my proudest moments working for Emory Healthcare involve the growth of Emory Specialty Pharmacy, which now has its own office in midtown and provides care to hundreds of patients daily. Being a part of the pharmacy’s growth over the years has been a great experience.

Bosco Lorio, PsyD, LPC

Behavioral Health Care Manager, Primary Care
Emory University Hospital Midtown

Lorio Bosco headshotAbout Pride:I appreciate being able to see the diversity of individuals coming together to represent the importance of the LGBTQ+ community in so many ways – from vendors, to events and the parade. I love that Atlanta supports us in having such visibility all weekend long.

Working in health care:Working with patients and giving them a safe space to talk about their sexual identity and/or orientation means a lot to me – and seeing them find relief and the ability to live life as their authentic selves is rewarding.

Susan Coburn

Medical Technologist
Emory Decatur Hospital

Susan Coburn headshotAbout Pride:If my math is correct, this will be my 27th year going to Pride, but the first volunteering! It is a great place to get together with friends and show the world that we are proud to be part of the community. I remember way back in the day seeing all those people in Piedmont Park just living out loud and proud in a time when that wasn’t the norm at all. Over the years we’ve lived through bomb scares, protesters, and rainstorms. At the end of it all, our rainbow still shines bright!

Working in health care:Working through the COVID crisis showed us all how important it is to work together as a team. I love the fact that each of us has a part to play in patient care. It truly takes a village!

Sonai Wyche

Medical Technologist
Emory University Hospital Midtown

Sonai Wyche headshotAbout Pride:Atlanta Pride is meaningful because this is one of the biggest cities for the LGBTQ+ community. It means so much to me to be able to celebrate and support the festival for the first time. I learned a lot about the community going to a college here that is very welcoming after growing up in a small southern town where it is not represented or celebrated as much.

Working in health care:Working in the lab, I’ve just enjoyed the work that I do. I was a student a year ago, so seeing things go from the classroom to real life was interesting. I don’t interact with patients often, but I also am thrilled when I’m able to help people that I see outside of the lab and when I analyze samples for patients whose treatment can be helped with the results I work to produce.

TJ Johnson

Patient and Family Advocate
Emory University Hospital
Emory University Hospital at Wesley Woods
Emory University Orthopedics & Spine Hospital

T.J. Johnson headshotAbout Pride:Atlanta Pride is meaningful to me because it’s a reminder and opportunity to celebrate being comfortable in my own skin. Being comfortable and happy with yourself is one of the first steps to living your best life.

Working in health care:Here at Emory Healthcare, I’ve been fortunate to have the opportunity to work with people of all backgrounds to create optimal experiences. I look forward to building relationships that continue to support inclusion, integrity and compassion.

Beth Curtis, RN, MSN

Interventional Radiology
Emory University Hospital

About Pride:Where I come from, there is no Pride festival – I used to drive up to attend. Seeing all the supportive people means a lot to me. My wife and I participated in the marriage ceremony before we could be legally married. We also have marched in the parade a few times.

Working in health care:Seeing gay couples come together for their appointments is something that makes me feel proud. I remember when couples didn’t have any legal rights and they couldn’t even see each other if one was hospitalized. Now they can be acknowledged as a couple and everyone treats them the same as a straight married couple or even a straight couple.

 

Where You Start Your Health Care Matters

If you’re feeling inspired to achieve your health and wellness goals, remember we’re here for all your health care needs – from your annual primary care visit to a new appointment with a specialist, and everything in between. We take pride in the care we provide!

Find out more about the care available at Emory Healthcare at emoryhealthcare.org/pride.

Schedule your appointment today.

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